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ICAN produced a book!

Coastal Informatics: Web Atlas Design and Implementation

Edited by Dawn J. Wright (Oregon State University, USA), Edward ("Ned") Dwyer and Valerie Cummins* (Coastal & Marine Resources Centre, Ireland, *now at the Maritime and Energy Research Campus and Commercial Cluster)

Foreword by Prof. Jacqueline McGlade, Executive Director, European Environment Agency

Published and available for purchase online by IGI-Global.

Wright, D.J., Dwyer, E., and Cummins, V. (eds.), 2011. Coastal Informatics: Web Atlas Design and Implementation, Hershey, PA: IGI-Global, DOI: 10.4018/978-1-61520-815-9, ISBN13: 9781615208159, 350 pp.

Access for OSU faculty/staff/students with ONID password (via paid subscription through OSU Libraries)

Rationale
In recent years, significant momentum has occurred in the development of Internet resources for decision makers, scientists and the general public who are interested in the coast. A key aspect of this trend has been the development of the coastal web atlas (CWA), based on a web-enabled geographic information systems (GIS). A CWA is defined as a collection of digital maps and datasets with supplementary tables, illustrations and information that systematically illustrate the coast, oftentimes with cartographic and decision-support tools, all of which are accessible via the Internet.

CWAs deal with a variety of thematic priorities (e.g., oil spills or recreational uses) and can be tailored to address the needs of a particular user group (e.g., coastal managers or education). There are many benefits which CWAs can provide, including:
- A portal to coastal data and information from diverse sources;
- Up-to-date geospatial data which are frequently changing;
- A widely accessible coastal resource to a broad audience;
- A comprehensive and searchable data catalogue;
- Improved efficiency in finding data, but also a wide range of ancillary information;
- An instrument for marine spatial planning;
- Interactive tools and resources which empower users to find their own answers;
- An educational resource which raises people’s consciousness about coastal topics.

Objective
The purpose of the book is to present the latest developments in the new field of coastal web atlases and to share best practices and lessons learned, which will in turn help readers to determine future needs in mapping and informatics for the coastal practitioner community and improve spatial thinking in the coastal context. This handbook provides a complete guide to CWA development and implementation including established principles and recommendations for atlas design, data requirements, necessary software technology and institutional capacity, as well as best practices for achieving interoperability between CWAs (where concepts, terminology, and even abbreviations that are shared between two or more atlases are understood by all to mean the same thing).

Target Audience
The prime audience for the handbook includes coastal resource managers and consultants, coastal scientists, coastal technologists (e.g., information technologists, GIS specialists, software developers), government researchers, and graduate students. The handbook should be especially valuable to coastal resource managers who need to tackle such topic-based issues (explaining environmental concepts to the public and reaching them with current information has always been a difficult task). It may also be suitable for intermediate, advanced courses in coastal/marine GIS or coastal zone management (i.e., courses toward a related B.Sc., M.Sc. or Ph.D. degree, in the classroom, but also potentially for distance education as well).


Coastal Informatics: Web Atlas Design and Implementation
TABLE OF CONTENTS

Foreword, Prof. Jacqueline McGlade, Executive Director, European Environment Agency

Preface, Editorial Board/Reviewers, Acknowledgment, Detailed Table of Contents

Author Bios

Front material appears in Coastal Informatics: Web Atlas Design and Implementation edited by Wright, Dwyer, and Cummins. Copyright 2010, IGI Global, www.igi-global.com. Posted by permission of the publisher.

Part I - Principles

Chapter 1 – Introduction: Coastal Web Atlas Defined
by Dawn Wright, Val Cummins, Ned Dwyer [edited by Val Cummins]
This chapter/paper appears in Coastal Informatics: Web Atlas Design and Implementation edited by Wright, Dwyer, and Cummins. Copyright 2010, IGI Global, www.igi-global.com. Posted by permission of the publisher.

Chapter 2 – Coastal Web Atlas Features
by Elizabeth O’Dea, Washington State Department of Ecology; Tanya Haddad, Oregon Coastal Management Program; Declan Dunne, CMRC; Kuuipo Walsh, OSU Institute for Natural Resources [edited by Ned Dwyer]
      2.1. Introduction
      2.2. Map Area
      2.3. Geographic Data
      2.4. Map Legend/Layer List
      2.5. Atlas Tools
      2.6. Attribute Tables
      2.8. Information/Extras
      2.9. Technology
      2.10. Conclusion
This chapter/paper appears in Coastal Informatics: Web Atlas Design and Implementation edited by Wright, Dwyer, and Cummins. Copyright 2010, IGI Global, www.igi-global.com. Posted by permission of the publisher.

Chapter 3 – Coastal Web Atlas Implementation
by Tanya Haddad, Oregon Coastal Management Program; Elizabeth O’Dea, Washington State Department of Ecology; Declan Dunne, CMRC; Kuuipo Walsh, OSU Institute for Natural Resources [edited by Dawn Wright]
      3.1. Getting Started
      3.2. Implementation
      3.2.1. Atlas Interface
      3.2.2. Map Area
      3.2.3. Geographic Data Content and Display
      3.2.4. Map Legend/Layer List
      3.2.5. Atlas Tools, Decision-support Tools
      3.2.6. Attribute Tables
      3.2.7. Information/Extras
      3.2.8. Content Management
      3.2.9. Software and Hardware Technology
      3.2.10. Interfacing with Web Services and Viewers (e.g., OGC services, Google Earth/Maps, ArcGIS Explorer/JavaScript API, etc.)
      3.2.11. User Feedback
      3.2.12. Curriculum Development from Atlases
      3.2.13. Support and Future Development

Chapter 4 – Coastal Web Atlas Interoperability
by Yassine Lassoued, CMRC; Trung T. Pham, CMRC; Luis Bermudez, Southeastern University Research Association (now with Open Geospatial Consortium); Karen Stocks, San Diego Supercomputer Center; Eoin O’Grady, Marine Institute, Ireland; Anthony Isenor, Defense R&D Canada – Atlantic, Canada; Paul Alexander, MMI & Stanford [edited by Dawn Wright]
      4.1. Interoperability – Why it Matters
      4.2. Standards
      4.3. Open Geospatial Consortium Services (e.g., WMS, WFS, WCS, CSW)
      4.4. Tools for Interoperability
      4.5. Introduction to Controlled Vocabularies and Ontologies
      4.6. Ontology Components and Practices
      4.7. Advanced Ontology Concepts
      4.8. Linking Your CWA to Regional Partners
      4.9. Approaches from Marine Metadata Interoperability (MMI), SeaDataNet, and the International Coastal Atlas Network (ICAN)

Part II - Coastal Web Atlas Case Studies Around the World

Chapter 5 - Overview of Atlases
by Dawn Wright, OSU; Gabe Sataloff, Tony LaVoi, NOAA CSC; Andrus Meiner, Ronan Uhel, EEA [edited by Ned Dwyer]
      5.1. Introduction and overview of US atlases
      5.2. Overview of European Union (EU) atlases
      5.3. Overview of Africa
      5.4. Overview of efforts around the world

Chapter 6 - Oregon, USA
by Tanya Haddad and Bob Bailey, Oregon Coastal Management Program; Dawn Wright, OSU [edited by Dawn Wright]

Chapter 7 – Ireland
by Ned Dwyer, Kathrin Kopke, Val Cummins, CMRC; Elizabeth O’Dea, Washington State Department of Ecology; Declan Dunne, CMRC [edited by Dawn Wright]
This chapter/paper appears in Coastal Informatics: Web Atlas Design and Implementation edited by Wright, Dwyer, and Cummins. Copyright 2010, IGI Global, www.igi-global.com. Posted by permission of the publisher.

Chapter 8 – Maryland and Virginia, USA
by Marcia Berman, Virginia Institute of Marine Science; Catherine McCall, Maryland Department of Natural Resources [edited by Dawn Wright]

Chapter 9 – Wisconsin, USA
by David Hart, University of Wisconsin Sea Grant Institute [edited by Dawn Wright]

Chapter 10 – Belgium
by Kathy Belpaeme, Hannelore Maelfait, Co-ordination Center for Integrated Coastal Zone Management, Belgium [edited by Ned Dwyer]

Chapter 11 – Africa
by Lucy Scott, Agulhas and Somali Currents Large Marine Ecosystem (ASCLME) Project, South Africa; Greg Reed, Australian Ocean Data Centre Joint Facility, Australia [edited by Ned Dwyer]

Chapter 12 – Caribbean
by Sean Padmanabhan, Institute of Marine Affairs, Republic of Trinidad & Tobago [edited by Dawn Wright]

Chapter 13 – UK
by David Green, University of Aberdeen, Scotland, UK [edited by Ned Dwyer]
This chapter/paper appears in Coastal Informatics: Web Atlas Design and Implementation edited by Wright, Dwyer, and Cummins. Copyright 2010, IGI Global, www.igi-global.com. Posted by permission of the publisher.

Chapter 14 – Spain
by Alejandro Iglesias-Campos, Government of Andalusia; Gonzalo Malvarez-García, University Pablo de Olavide; Jose Ojeda-Zújar, University of Seville; Jose Moreira-Madueño, Government of Andalusia [edited by Ned Dwyer]

Part III - Coastal Web Atlas Management and Governance Issues

Chapter 15 – The International Coastal Atlas Network
by Dawn Wright, OSU; Val Cummins, CMRC; Ned Dwyer, CMRC [edited by Ned Dwyer]

Chapter 16 - Coastal Atlases in the Context of SDI
by Tony LaVoi, Josh Murphy, Gabe Sataloff, NOAA CSC; Roger Longhorn, IDRA Ltd.; Andrus Meiner, Ronan Uhel, EEA; Dawn Wright, OSU; Ned Dwyer, CMRC [edited by Ned Dwyer]
      16. 1. Federated Coastal Atlas of the USA
      16. 2. European Atlas of the Seas
      16. 3. Other Initiatives

Chapter 17 - Creating a Usable Atlas
by Tim Nyerges, University of Washington; Kathy Belpaeme, Co-ordination Center for Integrated Coastal Zone Management, Belgium; Tanya Haddad, Oregon Coastal Management Program; David Hart, University of Wisconsin [edited by Dawn Wright]
      17.1. Atlas Audience
         17.1.1. User Capabilities
         17.1.2. User Needs
         17.1.3. User Expectations
      17.2. Web Interface Pitfalls
This chapter/paper appears in Coastal Informatics: Web Atlas Design and Implementation edited by Wright, Dwyer, and Cummins. Copyright 2010, IGI Global, www.igi-global.com. Posted by permission of the publisher.

Chapter 18 - Improving a Growing Atlas
by Tanya Haddad, Oregon Coastal Management Program; Declan Dunne, CMRC [edited by Dawn Wright]
      18.1 Server Logs
      18.2 User Surveys
      18.3. Learning from Atlas Use Patterns
      18.4. Change Over Time

Chapter 19 - Supporting a Successful Atlas
by Roger Longhorn, Info-Dynamics Research Associates Ltd, UK; Dawn Wright, OSU; Kathy Belpaeme, Hannelore Maelfait, Co-ordination Center for Integrated Coastal Zone Management, Belgium [edited by Ned Dwyer]
      19.1. – Partnerships / Institutional Support
      19.2. – Intellectual Property Rights
      19.3. – Atlas Publicity
      19.4. – Atlas Funding
      19.5. – Regional Governance and Partnerships (e.g., SeaDataNet, IODE, MMI, ICAN)

Further Reading (e-book version only)

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